Winter might have only begun, but 2019 is quickly coming to a close and what better way to finish out the year than sharing a few fun facts about December’s two birth flowers: the Narcissus and the Holly. While the two couldn’t be more diverse, one being a delicate (bulb) blossom and the other a wintery evergreen, both of these iconic winter plants

The Holly  

A popular plant for the cold winter months, it's no surprise that December shares this birth flower with the holly plant. Although this plant has relatively unnoticeable flowers, it would be more fitting to refer to it as December’s birth berry! Even though its most visibly seen and highlighted throughout the winter months, real holly plants will bloom small scented flowers during the spring which often attract great pollinators like bees and butterflies.   

Artificial Holly Plants

A surprise to most would be that the berries of holly aren’t berries but in fact called drupes and while some animals and even birds can enjoy these from the holly plant, they are in fact semi-toxic if consumed by humans.  

Holly Berries

As the last birth flower of the year, Holly is packed with symbolism; in Christianity it was once believed that the berries were white until they were stained red by Christ’s blood on the cross and its spiky leaves like a thorny crown on his head.   

Fake Holly Plants

Some say that holly symbolizes protection and defense while others associate it with a sense of optimism and happiness - all of which are great things to have at the end and beginning - of a new year and making it a great gift to give those born in the month of December.  


The Narcissus  

From the genus Narcissus (which also includes the daffodil!), the paperwhite Narcissus is one of the most popular winter blooms, making it only fitting to be December’s birth flower and associated with good wishes, hope, and wealth - all the things one wishes for end-of-year cheer and celebration! They also represent sweetness, purity and simplicity, all delicately showcased throughout its paper-thin flowers. 

December Birthflower: Narcissus

Recognizable for their trumpet-like shape, this delicate blossom has a sweet scent when in bloom. Usually seen in two colors (yellow and white), several new hybrids have been scientifically created. But should you decide to plant this flower in a garden, proceed with caution for although it might look sweet, the narcissus is extremely toxic and can cause surrounding flora to wilt and die - giving it a more symbolic view.  

December Birthflower: Narcissuss

Many legends and lore follow this easily recognizable flower, for even its name hails from ancient Greece; son of a Greek god and goddess, Narcissus was a handsome man who left women broken hearted with unrequited love. In punishment, he was cursed to look upon his reflection on a lake for eternity, causing him to fall deeply in love with himself and to die along the riverbank and to remain forever a flower. And while this connotation leaves a negative impression on this winter bloom, the Narcissus is often depicted as a sign of modesty, respect, and even faithfulness, evident throughout art and literature. 

December Birth Flower Meanings

For more inspiration head over to our Pinterest Board dedicated to December’s Birth Flower: the Narcissus and Holly

Please note all imagery featured is purely inspiration and not a product of Nearly Natural.

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