Now that Summer is officially behind us, a new season falls upon us and with that, the flora and fauna that we have come to associate with nature’s most colorful time of year. And while bright, fiery colors reign, the flower(s) associated with September tends to show a more regal side to Autumn: Morning Glory. Today, in honor of all the September birthdays, we’re sharing just a few tidbits and fun facts about this regal bloom.
Morning Glory Blossom
Funny enough, the Morning Glory got its name from the Latin previx ip which means “worm” or “worm-like.”  This would be due to the way that the flower grows; the flower resembling a worm as it slowly blossoms. 
Morning Glory Blossoms in Pink
Because Morning Glory come in several different colors and variations, it has come to be known as a flower of powerful affection. While blue is the most common symbolize trust and honor, fuchsia ones portray passion and confidence and yellow Morning Glories showcase positive energy, clarity, and happiness. 
Fields of Morning Glory
The beauty of the Morning Glory is fleeting as it blooms and dies in a single day; for this reason, during the Victorian era that it was used as a symbol of remembrance and never-ending love. 
Mixed Colors of Morning GloryMixed Colors of Morning Glory
Once considered sacred by the Aztecs, Mayans, and Native Americans, Morning Glory were used for their inner inducing properties. 
Royal Blue Morning Glory
It’s no surprise from their namesake, that these early bird rising flowers bloom in the early hours of the morning. But it is its fleeting nature of its beauty that has reached so many cultures in cultivating it to mean love. In fact, the behavior of the Morning Glory opens the eyes to love - to show us just how instant such a thing of beauty and perfection can be. 
Meanings of September's Birth Flower: Morning Glory
For more inspiration head over to our Pinterest Board dedicated to September's birth flower.
Please note all imagery featured is purely inspiration and not a product of Nearly Natural.

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